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Meet Mr. Glyphosate – a Case Study in Excess

Thanks to a reader for sending this along to us. I don’t normally like to publish posts that reflect negatively about a particular person (I can think of only one other instance when I have, and that was about the results of a man’s work, as is largely the case here), but I feel that the video above is such an example of sickening excess that it shouldn’t go unnoticed.

Regular readers will have been following the developing saga of glyphosate and its now increasingly documented damage to the health and well-being of not only individual plants, animals and people, but also of entire eco-systems. A quick search of our site for ‘glyphosate’ will give you a lot of informative reading….

Well, behind the glyphosate empire stands Dennis Albaugh, featured in the video above, ranked by Forbes as #468 from the world’s billionaires.

If, after watching the video above, you feel Mr. Albaugh’s life is still not quite complete, then please purchase some Roundup, knowing that your contribution may help him with his desperately needed car parking extensions.

Alternatively, it would be nice if someone could tell Mr. Albaugh that a paradigm shift is urgently needed in agriculture, which doesn’t include poisoning our present and future, and that his great wealth could be utilised towards that end instead — i.e. to undo the damage he has facilitated. That would seem to me a far more satisfying legacy to bequeath his family, and the wider global community, than that found in wandering around a bunch of basically unused automobiles in the evening at the expense of every living thing on the planet.

It is fascinating to me how we humans can live in such a bubble of useless excess, and actually look visibly proud of it, rather than ashamed.

Live simply, so that others may simply live….

Wealth is like sea-water; the more we drink, the thirstier we become; and the same is true of fame. — Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860) German philosopher

9 Comments

  1. I don’t understand why anyone would waste their time watching this and cultivating negativity. Ok, so this guy has sold a shit ton of chemicals, bought a bunch of fuel-hungry vehicles, and has a ridiculous golf course. So what? What good does it do you to watch this and inform yourself of the obvious and easy-to-read pattern of excessive and misused financial wealth? What are you going to do about it? Are you going to formulate a Permaculture operation for him to invest in? Are you going to provide something more valuable than chemicals and cars, hot air and sitting staring at a glowing screen all pissed off with nothing to do? Where did the energy that is running your computer while you watched this come from? How did the parts in your computer get manufactured and delivered for assembly? Did those manufacturing plants use glyphosate on their campus landscapes? Is the energy source a coal plant? Could you offer these companies a better alternative? What is being offered by posting this video besides stating the obvious? Most of the modern Western world is a case study in excess due to imbalance. This post is redundant at best.

  2. I don’t understand wanting that much stuff or that much house or a stupid golf course of any size, but don’t begrudge him any of it. What does really bother me is that he earned it poisoning the planet. I’ll give him the benefit of the doubt that, back when he started out, he honestly didn’t know how awful the crap was, but there’s no way he doesn’t know it now and yet continues to peddle it Worldwide . IMO that’s the outrageous and unforgivable bit.

  3. To me such a waste of space. I used be a golf ‘nut’ – now I would love to see these grounds as a productive long term food forest with fish ponds … could be amazing permaculture heaven on earth :-) How about building a golf course by using permaculture principles?

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